Power to the Public: The Promise of Public Interest Technology

Power to the PublicWorth a read for anyone who cares about making change happen. Barack Obama



A powerful new blueprint for how governments and nonprofits can harness the power of digital technology to help solve the most serious problems of the twenty first century

As the speed and complexity of the world increases, governments and nonprofit organizations need new ways to effectively tackle the critical challenges of our time from pandemics and global warming to social media warfare. In Power to the Public, Tara.

Dawson McGuinness and Hana Schank describe a revolutionary new approach public interest technology that has the potential to transform the way governments and nonprofits around the world solve problems. Through inspiring stories about successful projects ranging from a texting service for teenagers in crisis to a streamlined foster care system, the authors show how public interest technology can make the delivery of services to the public effective and efficient.

At its heart, public interest technology mea.

Power to the Public: The Promise of Public Interest TechnologyDawson McGuinness and Hana Schank describe a revolutionary new approach public interest technology that has the potential to transform the way governments and nonprofits around the world solve problems. Through inspiring stories about successful projects ranging from a texting service for teenagers in crisis to a streamlined foster care system, the authors show how public interest technology can make the delivery of services to the public effective and efficient.

At its heart, public interest technology mea.

The Myth of Artificial Intelligence: Why Computers Can't Think the Way We Do

The Myth of Artificial IntelligenceIf you want to know about AI, read this bookit shows how a supposedly futuristic reverence for Artificial Intelligence retards progress when it denigrates our most irreplaceable resource for any future progress: our own human intelligence. Peter Thiel



A cutting edge AI researcher and tech entrepreneur debunks the fantasy that superintelligence is just a few clicks away and argues that this myth is not just wrong, it's actively blocking innovation and distorting our ability to make the crucial next leap.

Futurists insist that AI will soon eclipse the capacities of the most gifted human mind. What hope do we have against superintellige.

Nt machines? But we aren't really on the path to developing intelligent machines. In fact, we don't even know where that path might be.

A tech entrepreneur and pioneering research scientist working at the forefront of natural language processing, Erik Larson takes us on a tour of the landscape of AI to show how far we are from superintelligence, and what it would take to get there. Ever since Alan Turing, AI enthusiasts have equated artificial intelligence with human intelligence. This is a profound mistake. AI works on inductive reasoning, crunching data sets to predict outcomes. But humans don't correlate data sets: we make conjectures informed b.

The Myth of Artificial Intelligence: Why Computers Can't Think the Way We DoNt machines? But we aren't really on the path to developing intelligent machines. In fact, we don't even know where that path might be.

A tech entrepreneur and pioneering research scientist working at the forefront of natural language processing, Erik Larson takes us on a tour of the landscape of AI to show how far we are from superintelligence, and what it would take to get there. Ever since Alan Turing, AI enthusiasts have equated artificial intelligence with human intelligence. This is a profound mistake. AI works on inductive reasoning, crunching data sets to predict outcomes. But humans don't correlate data sets: we make conjectures informed b.

The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race

The Code BreakerWhen Jennifer Doudna was in sixth grade, she came home one day to find that her dad had left a paperback titled The Double Helix on her bed. As she sped through the pages, she became enthralled by the intense drama behind the competition to discover the code of life. Even though her high school counselor told her girls didn’t become scientists, she decided she would.

Driven by a passion to understand how nature works and to turn discoveries into inventions, she would help to make what the book’s author, James Watson, told her was the most impo.

Rtant biological advance since his co discovery of the structure of DNA. She and her collaborators turned ​a curiosity ​of nature into an invention that will transform the human race: an easy to use tool that can edit DNA. Known as CRISPR, it opened a brave new world of medical miracles and moral questions. The development of CRISPR and the race to create vaccines for coronavirus will hasten our transition to the next great innovation revolution. The past half century has been a digital age, based on the microchip, computer, and internet. Now we are.

The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna Gene Editing and the Future of the Human RaceRtant biological advance since his co discovery of the structure of DNA. She and her collaborators turned ​a curiosity ​of nature into an invention that will transform the human race: an easy to use tool that can edit DNA. Known as CRISPR, it opened a brave new world of medical miracles and moral questions. The development of CRISPR and the race to create vaccines for coronavirus will hasten our transition to the next great innovation revolution. The past half century has been a digital age, based on the microchip, computer, and internet. Now we are.

Fulfillment: Winning and Losing in One-Click America

Red the age of one click America—and as the coronavirus makes Americans dependent on online shopping, its sway will only intensify.Alec MacGillis’s Fulfillment is not another inside account or exposé of our most conspicuously dominant company. Rather, it is a literary investigation of the America that falls within that company’s growing shadow. As MacGillis shows, ’s sprawling network of delivery hubs, data centers, and corporate campuses epitomizes a land where winner and loser cities and regions are drifting steadily apart, the civic fabric is unraveling, and work has become increasingly rudimentary and isolated.Ranging across the country, MacGillis tells the stories of those who’ve thrived and struggled to thrive in this rapidly changing environment. In Seattle, high paid workers in new office towers displace a historic black n.

Fulfillment: Winning and Losing in One-Click AmericaRed the age of one click America—and as the coronavirus makes Americans dependent on online shopping, its sway will only intensify.Alec MacGillis’s Fulfillment is not another inside account or exposé of our most conspicuously dominant company. Rather, it is a literary investigation of the America that falls within that company’s growing shadow. As MacGillis shows, ’s sprawling network of delivery hubs, data centers, and corporate campuses epitomizes a land where winner and loser cities and regions are drifting steadily apart, the civic fabric is unraveling, and work has become increasingly rudimentary and isolated.Ranging across the country, MacGillis tells the stories of those who’ve thrived and struggled to thrive in this rapidly changing environment. In Seattle, high paid workers in new office towers displace a historic black n.

FulfillmentA New York Times Book Review Editors' ChoiceA grounded and expansive examination of the American economic divide . It takes a skillful journalist to weave data and anecdotes together so effectively. —Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles TimesAn award winning journalist investigates ’s impact on the wealth and poverty of towns and cities across the United States.In 1937, the famed writer and activist Upton Sinclair published a novel bearing the subtitle A Story of Ford America. He blasted the callousness of a company worth “a billion dollars” that underpaid its workers while forcing them to engage in repetitive and sometimes dangerous assembly line labor. Eighty three years later, the market capitalization of .com has exceeded one trillion dollars, while the value of the Ford Motor Company hovers around thirty billion. We have, it seems, ente.

Liftoff: Elon Musk and the Desperate Early Days That Launched SpaceX

LiftoffThis is as important a book on space as has ever been written and it's a riveting page turner, too. —Homer Hickam, #1 New York Times Bestselling Author of Rocket Boys

The dramatic inside story of the historic flights that launched SpaceX—and Elon Musk—from a shaky startup into the world's leading edge rocket company.

SpaceX has enjoyed a miraculous decade. Less than 20 years after its founding, it boasts the largest constellation of commercial satellites in orbit, has pioneered reusable rockets, and in 2020 became the first private company to launch human beings into orbit. Half a century after the space race it is private companies, led by SpaceX, standing alongside NASA pushing forward into the cosmos, and laying the foundation for our exploration of other worlds.

But before it became.

One of the most powerful players in the aerospace industry, SpaceX was a fledgling startup, scrambling to develop a single workable rocket before the money ran dry. The engineering challenge was immense; numerous other private companies had failed similar attempts. And even if SpaceX succeeded, they would then have to compete for government contracts with titans such as Lockheed Martin and Boeing, who had tens of thousands of employees and tens of billions of dollars in annual revenue. SpaceX had fewer than 200 employees and the relative pittance of \$100 million in the bank.

In Liftoff, Eric Berger, senior space editor at Ars Technica, takes readers inside the wild early days that made SpaceX. Focusing on the company’s first four launches of the Falcon 1 rocket, he charts the bumpy journey from scrappy u.

Liftoff: Elon Musk and the Desperate Early Days That Launched SpaceXOne of the most powerful players in the aerospace industry, SpaceX was a fledgling startup, scrambling to develop a single workable rocket before the money ran dry. The engineering challenge was immense; numerous other private companies had failed similar attempts. And even if SpaceX succeeded, they would then have to compete for government contracts with titans such as Lockheed Martin and Boeing, who had tens of thousands of employees and tens of billions of dollars in annual revenue. SpaceX had fewer than 200 employees and the relative pittance of \$100 million in the bank.

In Liftoff, Eric Berger, senior space editor at Ars Technica, takes readers inside the wild early days that made SpaceX. Focusing on the company’s first four launches of the Falcon 1 rocket, he charts the bumpy journey from scrappy u.

The Fall of Koli (Rampart Trilogy #3)

Village of Mythen Rood. In his search for the fabled tech of the old times, he knew he'd be battling strange, terrible beasts and trees that move as fast as whips. But he has already encountered so much than he bargained for.

Now that Koli and his companions hav.

The Fall of Koli (Rampart Trilogy #3)Village of Mythen Rood. In his search for the fabled tech of the old times, he knew he'd be battling strange, terrible beasts and trees that move as fast as whips. But he has already encountered so much than he bargained for.

Now that Koli and his companions hav.

The Fall of Koli The Fall of Koli is the third and final novel in the breathtakingly original Rampart trilogy set in a strange and deadly world of our own making.

The world that is lost will come back to haunt us .

Koli has come a long way since being exiled from his small.

Genius Makers: The Mavericks Who Brought AI to Google, Facebook, and the World

Genius Makers: The Mavericks Who Brought AI to Google Facebook and the WorldIal discourse, and our daily lives, with few of us even noticing.

Long dismissed as a technology of the distant future, artificial intelligence was a project consigned to the fringes of the scientific community. Then two researchers changed everything. One was a sixty four year old computer science professor who didn't drive and didn't fly because he could no longer sit down but still made his way across North America for the moment that would define a new age of technology. The other was a thirty six year old neuroscientist and chess prodigy who laid claim to being the greatest game player of all time before vowing to build a machine that could do anything the human brain could do.

They took two very different paths to that lofty goal, and they disagreed on how quickly it would arri.

Genius Makers: The Mavericks Who Brought AI to Google, Facebook, and the World

Genius MakersThis colorful page turner puts artificial intelligence into a human perspective. Through the lives of Geoff Hinton and other major players, Metz explains this transformative technology and makes the quest thrilling. Walter Isaacson, author of The Code Breaker



Recipient of starred reviews in both Kirkus and Library JournalTHE UNTOLD TECH STORY OF OUR TIME

What does it mean to be smart? To be human? What do we really want from life and the intelligence we have, or might create?

With deep and exclusive reporting, across hundreds of interviews, New York Times Silicon Valley journalist Cade Metz brings you into the rooms where these questions are being answered. Where an extraordinarily powerful new artificial intelligence has been built into our biggest companies, our soc.

Ial discourse, and our daily lives, with few of us even noticing.

Long dismissed as a technology of the distant future, artificial intelligence was a project consigned to the fringes of the scientific community. Then two researchers changed everything. One was a sixty four year old computer science professor who didn't drive and didn't fly because he could no longer sit down but still made his way across North America for the moment that would define a new age of technology. The other was a thirty six year old neuroscientist and chess prodigy who laid claim to being the greatest game player of all time before vowing to build a machine that could do anything the human brain could do.

They took two very different paths to that lofty goal, and they disagreed on how quickly it would arri.

We Are Bellingcat: Global Crime, Online Sleuths, and the Bold Future of News

Came from Bellingcat, the open source investigative team that is redefining the way we think about news, politics, and the digital future.We Are Bellingcat tells the inspiring story of how a college dropout pioneered a new category of reporting and galvanized citizen journalists working together from their computer screens around the globe to crack major cases, at a time when fact based journalism is under assault from authoritarian forces. Founder Eliot Higgins introd.

We Are Bellingcat: Global Crime Online Sleuths and the Bold Future of NewsCame from Bellingcat, the open source investigative team that is redefining the way we think about news, politics, and the digital future.We Are Bellingcat tells the inspiring story of how a college dropout pioneered a new category of reporting and galvanized citizen journalists working together from their computer screens around the globe to crack major cases, at a time when fact based journalism is under assault from authoritarian forces. Founder Eliot Higgins introd.

We Are BellingcatThe page turning inside account of the organization solving international mysteries and wielding the power of the internet to fight for facts.In 2018, Russian exile Sergei Skripal and his daughter were nearly killed in an audacious poisoning attempt in Salisbury, England. Soon, the identity of one of the suspects was revealed: he was a Russian spy. This huge investigative coup wasn't pulled off by an intelligence agency or a traditional news outlet. Instead, the scoop.

A Thousand Brains: A New Theory of Intelligence

A Thousand Brains: A New Theory of IntelligenceSt question: How do simple cells in the brain create intelligence? Jeff Hawkins and his team discovered that the brain uses maplike structures to build a model of the world not just one model, but hundreds.

A Thousand Brains: A New Theory of Intelligence

A Thousand BrainsAn author, neuroscientist, and computer engineer unveils a theory of intelligence, of understanding the brain and the future of AI. For all of neuroscience's advances, we've made little progress on its bigge.

St question: How do simple cells in the brain create intelligence? Jeff Hawkins and his team discovered that the brain uses maplike structures to build a model of the world not just one model, but hundreds.

Flash Forward: An Illustrated Guide to Possible (And Not So Possible) Tomorrows

Work, including Matt Lubchanksy, Sophie Goldstein, Ben Pass, and Box Brown. Each artist chooses a subject close to their heart—Ignatz Award nominee Julia Gfrörer, for instance, will imagine a future in which robots make art—and presents their chosen future in their own style. Drawing on her interviews with experts in various fields of study, Eveleth will then report on what is complete fantasy and what is only just out of reach in insightful essays following the comi.

Flash Forward: An Illustrated Guide to Possible (And Not So Possible) TomorrowsWork, including Matt Lubchanksy, Sophie Goldstein, Ben Pass, and Box Brown. Each artist chooses a subject close to their heart—Ignatz Award nominee Julia Gfrörer, for instance, will imagine a future in which robots make art—and presents their chosen future in their own style. Drawing on her interviews with experts in various fields of study, Eveleth will then report on what is complete fantasy and what is only just out of reach in insightful essays following the comi.

Flash ForwardAn exploration of potential tomorrows from the host of the massively popular and critically acclaimed podcast Flash Forward Flash Forward: An Illustrated Guide to Possible (And Not So Possible) Tomorrows takes readers on a journey from speculative fiction to speculative “fact.” Producer and host of the podcast Flash Forward, Rose Eveleth poses provocative questions about our future, which are brought to life by 12 of the most imaginative comics and graphic artists at.

Silicon Values: The Future of Free Speech Under Surveillance Capitalism

Silicon ValuesHow Google, Facebook and threaten our Democracy

What is the impact of surveillance capitalism on our right to free speech? The Internet once promised to be a place of extraordinary freedom beyond the control of money or politics, but today corporations and platforms exercise control over our ability to access information and share knowledge to a greater extent than any state. From the online calls to arms in the thick of the Arab Spring to the contemporary front line of misinformatio.

N, Jillian York charts the war over our digital rights. She looks at both how the big corporations have become unaccountable censors, and the devastating impact it has had on those who have been censored.

In Silicon Values, leading campaigner Jillian York, looks at how our rights have become increasingly undermined by the major corporations desire to harvest our personal data and turn it into profit. She also looks at how governments have used the same technology to monitor citizens.

Silicon Values: The Future of Free Speech Under Surveillance CapitalismN, Jillian York charts the war over our digital rights. She looks at both how the big corporations have become unaccountable censors, and the devastating impact it has had on those who have been censored.

In Silicon Values, leading campaigner Jillian York, looks at how our rights have become increasingly undermined by the major corporations desire to harvest our personal data and turn it into profit. She also looks at how governments have used the same technology to monitor citizens.